Author Topic: A perfect gybe  (Read 2619 times)

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Offline iznogoud

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A perfect gybe
« on: July 22, 2008, 19:13:57 PM »
Hello,

Any can tell me how they do it properly... light wind not much of a problem, but when the wind get stronger I still end up un the side.

Thanks

Offline Zimonem

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Re: A perfect gybe
« Reply #1 on: July 23, 2008, 21:54:00 PM »
Hello,

Any can tell me how they do it properly... light wind not much of a problem, but when the wind get stronger I still end up un the side.

Thanks

any gybe that you can sail away was a good gybe...

Offline pogen

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Re: A perfect gybe
« Reply #2 on: July 24, 2008, 03:00:04 AM »
Well that's the problem innit?  ;)

Offline iznogoud

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Re: A perfect gybe
« Reply #3 on: July 24, 2008, 22:21:29 PM »
yep that's the problem,

Got a bit better today... didn't broach so I would say it was a succes...

Offline SpeedyG

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Re: A perfect gybe
« Reply #4 on: July 31, 2008, 21:39:36 PM »
That's how I do it ...
Sail as much downwind as you can.

* Center the bowsprit
* [Edit:] center the traveller
* pull in the mainsail sheet hard.
* pull in the lee side backstay.
* when your helmsman (or autopilot) starts gybing (slowly!),
   release the gennaker clew sheet, till it reaches about the forestay, in parallel,
   already pull in the other side as fast as you can. When the clew is around the
   forestay, completely release the "old" clew sheet, and pull hard on the other one ...
* I have 4 winches on board, so I usually use the 2 on the cockpit roof for the
  "clew sheets".
   When starting, I'm generally standing/kneeing in the middle of the cockpit,
   the head on the lower side of the boat, this has 2 advantages :
   1) the boom won't hit you
   2) you can see the gennaker better
* fix the gennaker in a stable postion (i.e. don't open the clew too much), then
* release the new lower backstay
* open the main - sheet / traveller
* trim the gennaker

If doublehanded, the trick is to do the first half of the gybe slowly, to give you enough
time to handle the gennaker. After pulling the clew around the forestay to the new side,
your helmsman can turn quicker.

If you're singelhanded and it gets too tough, bring down the whole gennager, gybe without, and hoist it again on the other side.
Better loose some time, instead of a sail :-))

Thomas

GER 521, SpeedyG
« Last Edit: August 01, 2008, 21:39:14 PM by SpeedyG »
Thomas Rauch
SpeedyG, GER 521

Offline iznogoud

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Re: A perfect gybe
« Reply #5 on: August 05, 2008, 15:28:24 PM »
Thanks for that. Sounds almost as I'm doing. I guess I just need to spend time training.
Last time I to bring the main in with the runner instead of the sheet. It seamed to work, but I guess in more wind it will be too difficult.

Cheers

Offline SpeedyG

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Re: A perfect gybe
« Reply #6 on: August 05, 2008, 20:10:41 PM »
With the runner only, I don't get enough backstay tension, too much twist in the top of the
main sail ...
Possibly you'd have to use the winch for the backstay, but I don't like that, because ...
* sooner or later you'll damage the top of your main sail  or maybe break your battens.
* I don't have the right feeling for the backstay tension (normally I do it by hand only
  on my Zero)

Cheers,

Thomas
GER 521, SpeedyG
Thomas Rauch
SpeedyG, GER 521